• Montana Territory

    Montana Territory celebrates 150 years

    By  JESSE ZENTZ

     

    The place we now call Montana faced an uncertain future when it gained territorial status 150 years ago, but what would eventually become known as the Treasure State held great promise in 1864.

    Gold was king in bustling mining communities like Bannack and Virginia City, which pulsed with activity; while today’s larger cities were in their infancy or were simply nonexistent.

    Vigilantes played the role of judge, jury and executioner. In a span of less than two months bridging 1863 and 1864, the Montana Vigilantes hanged 24 men as they ruthlessly wiped out Bannack Sheriff Henry Plummer’s gang, which killed more than 100 people and robbed countless others.

    Agriculture only began to take root in places like the Gallatin Valley in an effort to support the expanding mining communities, but the territory’s isolation and other factors limited growth.

    American Indians – Montana’s original residents – felt the initial squeeze of substantial white settlement and delicate treaties were often ignored by many homesteaders or settlers distracted by the thought of striking it rich.

     

    Want to know more about Montana history? Here’s a recommended reading list:

    Montana 1864, by Kenneth Egan (due out in September 2014), explores the year Montana became a territory in detail, giving special attention to tribal nations.

    Montana: High, Wide, and Handsome, by Joseph Kinsey Howard, is a history book about Montana, but often reads like a novel and provides readers with detailed descriptions and a unique take on this state’s past.

    The Last Best Place: A Montana Anthology, edited by William Kittredge and Annick Smith, features a compilation of some of the very best writing about Montana, which is home to a surprising number of true literary artists.

    Montana Territory and the Civil War, by Ken Robison, introduces readers to many of the people touched by the Civil War who populated Montana, demonstrating the incredible impact the events in the eastern United States had on the territory and state.

    Montana: A History of Two Centuries, by Michael P. Malone, Richard B Roeder, William L. Lang, offers a general but comprehensive textbook-style history of Montana.

    Territorial Politics and Government in Montana 1864-89, by Clark C. Spence, offers a close look at Montana’s early political landscape that eventually led to statehood in 1889.

    Montana: An Uncommon Land, by K. Ross Toole, provides another take on Montana history that’s as enjoyable to read as it is informative.

     

     Still need more about the Montana of 1864? Here’s some other resources:

    Montana Historical Society

    Founded only a year after Montana became a territory, the Montana Historical Society is an unrivaled historical resource. Located in Helena, the Montana Historical Society Museum is home to an incredible collection of fine art and historical artifacts. You can visit the museum throughout the year. Learn more online at www.MontanaHistoricalSociety.org.

    Humanities Montana

    At www.HumantiesMontana.com, you can find information about events happening throughout the state, learn about a variety of grants and resources available, and much more.

    Your local library

    Montana’s libraries are full of amazing collections about Montana history, and thanks to a great online resource at www.MyMontanaLibrary.com, finding your local library is only a couple mouse clicks away. Most of the books mentioned above are available, along with many others.

     

    To read the entire feature on Montana Territory’s 150th anniversary, find this issue on newsstands now. To read more about Montana all year, subscribe now.

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