• John Bozeman’s unhappy ending

    John Bozeman. Photo from the Montana Historical Society

    John Bozeman. Photo from the Montana Historical Society

    For our final 150th Montana Territory anniversary post here’s a little bit about John Bozeman . Yep. That Bozeman. Along he had a town named after him, turns out, he wasn’t in Montana too long:

    From Jesse Zentz:

    John Bozeman only lasted in Montana for five years, but this “character” played an important role in Montana’s early territorial days. He arrived in Montana in 1862 and died in 1867. It remains unclear whether he was killed by Blackfeet Indians or partner Tom Cover. Before his death, he helped plan the Bozeman Trail – a route from the Oregon Trail to Bannack – and he founded the city named after him in August of 1864.

    “He’s a son of Georgia. He’s clearly in flight from an unhappy marriage and an unhappy life down south. He’s in flight from the Civil War. He seems to be very good at promoting himself and he’s very good at finding schemes to pursue. In the end, he does not have a happy ending. He ends up getting shot in 1867 and one can only guess what happened there, but he may have been partly responsible. I’ll leave it at that,” said Ken Egan, executive director of Humanities Montana. 

    Just because we’re done celebrating, doesn’t mean there’s not more to see. First, check out this 365-day historical facts project from the Missoulian. Also, if you want to take part in an “official” celebration, the 41st Annual Montana History Conference, presented by the Montana Historical Society, will take place Sept. 18-20 in Helena and focus on Montana Milestones as in commemorates 150 years of Montana arriving on the map. For more information, visit www.mhs.mt.gov/education/ConferencesWorkshops.asp.

    - Jenna 

  • The Frey family on the southwest side of Great Falls in the early 1930s. A photographer would bring the cart and goat to homes, take a picture and create a postcard for families to purchase. Photo submitted by Joleen Frey

    Montana history buffs, this list is for you

    We’ve only started scratching the surface this week during our celebration of Montana’s history in the 150 years since it became a territory.

    There’s plenty more to learn. Once again, writer Jesse Zentz (have you checked out his story in our May/June issue yet?) has an awesome list of sources where you can find out more about Montana.

    It begins with the wonderful Montana Historical Society:

    Montana Historical Society

    Founded only a year after Montana became a territory, the Montana Historical Society is an unrivaled historical resource. Located in Helena, the Montana Historical Society Museum is home to an incredible collection of fine art and historical artifacts. You can visit the museum throughout the year. Learn more online at www.MontanaHistoricalSociety.org.

    Humanities Montana

    At www.HumantiesMontana.com, you can find information about events happening throughout the state, learn about a variety of grants and resources available, and much more.

    Your local library

    Montana’s libraries are full of amazing collections about Montana history, and thanks to a great online resource at www.MyMontanaLibrary.com, finding your local library is only a couple mouse clicks away. Most of the books mentioned above are available, along with many others.

    Take a road trip or a walk around town

    Located throughout Montana along some of the busiest highways and the lonely ones, too, the Montana Department of Transportation’s roadside signs offer some great historical tidbits about geological happenings in the state’s history. You can visit http://www.mdt.mt.gov/travinfo/geomarkers.shtml to find the signs.

    - Jenna

  • Bozeman native, pro cyclist shares favorite MT road ride

    The first rides Tejay van Garderen took on the road to becoming one of the top cyclists in the world were in and around Bozeman. It was on those roads that his parents noticed he a had particular grit that would eventually propel him into a top position in American cycling.

    Tejay is featured in the Jan/Feb issue of Montana Magazine in a story by Jesse Zentz. After many success, this year Tejay is focused on winning a few key races, and as Zentz explains, is considered a top American contender to win the Tour de France in the coming years.

    But if Tejay could ride anywhere in Montana, where would it be?

    He told us it’s the 75 mile Battle Bridge Road ride that takes riders from Bozeman’s Main Street almost to Wilsall.

    Here’s the official route for the Battle Ridge Road ride

    Distance: 75 miles

    Elevation gain: 3,373 feet based on MapMyRide.com

    Start: Bozeman (intersection of Main Street and Rouse Avenue)

    Turnaround: Near Wilsall (intersection of Bridger Canyon Road and Highway 89)

    Route: Follow Rouse Avenue north for about 1 mile, when it turns into Bridger Canyon Road. Continue on Bridger Canyon road for about 36 more miles until it ends at the intersection of Highway 89. Turn around and do it all over in the opposite direction.

     Van Garderen: “I really liked the Battle Ridge climb outside of Bozeman near Bridger Bowl. That was probably the hardest climb. To me, thinking about it now, it was like Alp d’Huez or something. But I’m sure if I went back, it might be a bit easier that I remember. That was a long tide and it was pretty country and a really hard climb. I don’t know how long it was in terms of miles, but it would usually take me about four hours to go over it, to go down and back up the other side and back home. Like I said, it was a long time ago (likely 2003) and it might be a two-and-a-half-hour ride these days.”

    Here’s a link a map of the ride: www.mapmyride.com/routes/view/328715611

    Thanks Tejay for sharing this ride!

    Jenna

  • Road to Victory: World class cyclist Tejay van Garderen and his Montana roots

    BY JESSE ZENTZ, PHOTO BY TIM DE WAELE

    As a kid growing up in the Gallatin Valley, Tejay van Garderen lost his job delivering the newspaper.

    It wasn’t because he couldn’t ride his bike fast enough. No, despite exceptional ability at making two wheels roll rapidly, van Garderen’s elapsed time on his roll out of bed was simply sub-standard.

    “I was fast getting the route done, but I just couldn’t get up at 5:30 in the morning, so I’d always end up delivering them late,” he said.

    Late deliveries are a thing of the past.

    At just 25 years old, van Garderen enters his fourth professional season viewed by many as the face of U.S. road cycling and as America’s best hope for a Tour de France victory.

    To read the rest of Zentz’s story on the Tejay, find this issue on newsstands now. To read more Montana all year, subscribe now.

     

    Did you know?

    Rare feat: Van Garderen claimed the white Best Young Rider’s jersey in the 2012 Tour de France, joining Greg Lemond (1984) and Andy Hampsten (1986) as the only Americans to accomplish that feat. The Best Young Rider’s jersey is awarded to the top finisher age 25 or younger. Van Garderen was 23 when he wore white.

    Watch the video here: www.youtube.com/watch?v=ElAH8LEoEAs

    Only one: In the 2011 Tour de France, van Garderen became the first American to don the polka dot King of the Mountains jersey when he finished the eighth stage with enough points to take the lead in that category. He was 22 at the time.

    Watch the video here: www.youtube.com/watch?v=7qg28chbmE8

    Accomplished wife: Jessica van Garderen also is an accomplished cyclist, although she’s spending more time raising a family these days. In 2009, she was national champion in the time trial and placed 14th in the same event at worlds. She also started an organic baby-clothing line, called Bumsies (www.bumsies.org). The company helps fund the Bumi Sehat Foundation (www.bumisehatfoundation.org).