• The Frey family on the southwest side of Great Falls in the early 1930s. A photographer would bring the cart and goat to homes, take a picture and create a postcard for families to purchase. Photo submitted by Joleen Frey

    Montana history buffs, this list is for you

    We’ve only started scratching the surface this week during our celebration of Montana’s history in the 150 years since it became a territory.

    There’s plenty more to learn. Once again, writer Jesse Zentz (have you checked out his story in our May/June issue yet?) has an awesome list of sources where you can find out more about Montana.

    It begins with the wonderful Montana Historical Society:

    Montana Historical Society

    Founded only a year after Montana became a territory, the Montana Historical Society is an unrivaled historical resource. Located in Helena, the Montana Historical Society Museum is home to an incredible collection of fine art and historical artifacts. You can visit the museum throughout the year. Learn more online at www.MontanaHistoricalSociety.org.

    Humanities Montana

    At www.HumantiesMontana.com, you can find information about events happening throughout the state, learn about a variety of grants and resources available, and much more.

    Your local library

    Montana’s libraries are full of amazing collections about Montana history, and thanks to a great online resource at www.MyMontanaLibrary.com, finding your local library is only a couple mouse clicks away. Most of the books mentioned above are available, along with many others.

    Take a road trip or a walk around town

    Located throughout Montana along some of the busiest highways and the lonely ones, too, the Montana Department of Transportation’s roadside signs offer some great historical tidbits about geological happenings in the state’s history. You can visit http://www.mdt.mt.gov/travinfo/geomarkers.shtml to find the signs.

    - Jenna

    • Dorrington_William_2jpeg

      William Dorrington was considered a Glacier Park Ranger before it was a national park. Photo submitted by Randy Dorrington

    • Joleen Frey

      The Frey family on the southwest side of Great Falls in the early 1930s. A photographer would bring the cart and goat to homes, take a picture and create a postcard for families to purchase. Photo submitted by Joleen Frey

    • Jurovich_clan_Washoe

      The Jurovich family near Washoe circa 1935. Photo submitted by Ron See

    • snowmobile

      Sidney postal carrier Andy Kappel with the Model T he outfitted with a pair of skis and idler wheels so he could complete his route during the winters of the 1930s. Submitted by Earl Simonson

    • swiftcurrent_pass_ranger_dorrington_(2)

      William Dorrington at Swiftcurrent Pass. Dorrington was considered a Glacier Park Ranger before it was a national park. Photo submitted by Randy Dorrington

    Pictured in History: Montana of the early years

    We love featuring historic photos of the faces and places of Montana inside the pages of the print editions. Most come for our readers, who share sentimental and rare images of their families and friends that have been passed down through generations. They’re special pieces of the state’s history.

    We’ve compiled a few of the “Pictured in History” shots here to help continue to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the Montana Territory. Many of the photos here are taken in the 1930s to the 1940s.

    As we found when researching the story of the 150th anniversary of the Montana Territory, there weren’t many cameras or photographers present in the west during the 1860s. Portraits were much more common than candid shots or scenic shots. With the help of the Montana Historical Society we were able to run some shots of early territory towns, such as Virginia City.

    Inside our May/June issue, we also have a portrait of Calamity Jane.

    Turns out that Calamity Jane may have had a long history in Montana. This is from writer Jesse Zentz:

    Known mostly for her time spent with Wild Bill Hickok in Deadwood, S.D., Egan said he found newspaper evidence in the Montana Post placing Calamity Jane – then Martha Jane Cannary – in Virginia City in December 1864. He said an article in the December 31, 1864, issue of the Montana Post indicates she was only 8 years old and begging on the streets of Virginia City. 

    - Jenna

  • Montana Territory

    Time to celebrate with the May/June issue

    We’ve got history. We’ve got horses. We’ve got places to play. We’ve got food. The May/June issue of Montana Magazine has a lot to celebrate and it’s ready to read now.

    With all there is to read, a couple celebrations take center stage. First, writer Jesse Zentz takes us back in time to the Montana of 1864 – when the area was officially granted territory status 150 years ago. It was the Wild West no doubt. Also, writers Kristen Inbody and Erin Madison take us back in time and explain the conception of Montana State Parks. The system is celebrating its 75th anniversary this year and we’re encouraging everyone to get out and explore the 54 parks spread across the state.

    That’s just a sliver of the stories included in the May/June issue.

    All our preview content is up at MontanaMagazine.com. If you’re looking for a full print copy, check out our list of vendor locations.

    Enjoy!

    - Jenna

     

    Giant Springs State Park Montana Magazine

    Giant Springs State Park in Great Falls. Photo by Roland Taylor