• Garnet volunteers are treated to amazing night time views. Photo by Bob Wick, Bureau of Land Management

    Come live in a Montana ghost town

    Looking for an unusual summer gig this year?

    You could really get to know Garnet Ghost Town, a popular Montana state park that brings in volunteers to run summer tours. The town’s needs a summer volunteer this year.

    Perks: A summer spent outdoors getting to know one of the most historical places in the state.

    Garnet Ghost Town contains several restored buildings from its years as a gold- and silver-mining boomtown. Photo courtesy of Bob Wick, BLM

    Garnet Ghost Town contains several restored buildings from its years as a gold- and silver-mining boomtown.
    Photo courtesy of Bob Wick, BLM

    BLM provides a private furnished cabin with propane stove and refrigerator, wood stove and a food stipend. Volunteers will provide visitor information, lead tours and handle sales of souvenirs.

    Those interested could also work with area maintenance, assisting with special events and developing signs and exhibits. Background checks are required for all applicants.

    Downsides: No running water. No Wi-Fi.

    “It’s primitive, to say the least,” U.S. Bureau of Land Management Garnet Ranger Nacoma Gainan said. “It’s for people who love the outdoors and want to give back. There’s no electricity, no Wi-Fi and no running water. But there are trails to explore, artifacts to inspect. Volunteers are really left to their own devices after the visitors are gone.”

    Still, if you’re hoping to apply, you better hurry. The story about the opening spread far and wide across the Internet.

    Here’s the application instructions:  Contact BLM Missoula Field Office by calling (406) 329-3735 or by email at ngainan@blm.gov. For more information about Garnet, visit the Missoula Field Office’s website at blm.gov/j5ld or the Garnet Preservation Association’s site at blm.gov/k5ld.

    Good luck!

    Jenna

  • People gather Tuesday for a ribbon-cutting celebrating completion of a two-year, $28.5 million renovation of Lake Hotel in Yellowstone National Park. Photo courtesy of Billings Gazette

    Historic Yellowstone hotel gets national recognition

    Big news for a big part of Yellowstone National Park: The historic Lake Yellowstone Hotel has been designated a National Historic Landmark.

    It is the oldest hotel inside America’s first national park.

    Rick Hoeninghausen, director of sales and marketing for Xanterra Parks and Resorts, points out a few spots where last-minute window clenaing is needed by Michaela Matuskva before a ribbon-cutting celebrating completion of a two-year, $28.5 million renovation of Lake Hotel in Yellowstone National Park. Photo courtesy of the Billings Gazette

    Rick Hoeninghausen, director of sales and marketing for Xanterra Parks and Resorts, points out a few spots where last-minute window clenaing is needed by Michaela Matuskva before a ribbon-cutting celebrating completion of a two-year, $28.5 million renovation of Lake Hotel in Yellowstone National Park. Photo courtesy of the Billings Gazette

    Initially designed by architect N.L. Haller of Washington, D.C., and constructed in 1891, the Lake Yellowstone Hotel was entirely reconceived in the first decades of the 20th century by architect Robert C. Reamer as a grand resort hotel displaying the Colonial Revival style. Currently the park’s oldest hotel in existence, the building overlooks the north shore of Yellowstone Lake. 

    This comes after a $28.5 million renovation, according to the Billings Gazette story.

     Here’s a little more about the renovation

    Repairs to the Yellowstone Lake Hotel have been extensive over the past two years, totaling $28.5 million in improvements. Photo courtesy of Billings Gazette

    Repairs to the Yellowstone Lake Hotel have been extensive over the past two years, totaling $28.5 million in improvements. Photo courtesy of Billings Gazette

    Perched along the north shore of Yellowstone Lake, the hotel is far from major attractions like Old Faithful and the Upper Falls of the Yellowstone River, so it’s usually less crowded, hosting visitors who typically move at a slower pace.

    The hotel first opened in 1891 as a three-story clapboard structure with 80 guest rooms. Between 1903 and 1937, a series of expansions led by architect Robert Reamer turned the hotel into a 210-room Colonial Revival style lakefront complex beloved for a its Ionic columns and genteel sun room, which still hosts string quartets and pianists performing for visitors taking a sweeping view of the largest alpine lake in North America.

    Adding bathrooms to each guest room has cut the current room count to 153.

    Learn more about our upcoming issue featuring Yellowstone here.

  • The Frey family on the southwest side of Great Falls in the early 1930s. A photographer would bring the cart and goat to homes, take a picture and create a postcard for families to purchase. Photo submitted by Joleen Frey

    Pictured in History: Send us your #TBT photos

    We love seeing photos from back in the day. And Throwback Thursday is the perfect time to share our collection of the great historical photos readers have sent us throughout the years.

    Here’s a slideshow of some of our favorites from 2014.

    And did you see this one of the “expert bullwhip specialist“? It’s one of my favorites from our archives.

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    From the Montana Magazine archives

    Here’s a post about some vintage stories (including great photos!) from our more recent issues.

    That should satiate your #tbt appetite, right?

    Now, we need your help. Do you have historical or old family photos you’d like to share with Montana Magazine? We’d love to see them (and don’t forget to subscribe today so you can see all the historical photos in print).

    You can email the images to me at editor@montanamagazine.com, including your information and a full description of the image.

    Thanks for sharing!

    – Jenna

  • Portions of Yellowstone National Park’s road system will open to the public on Friday. Photo by Brett French

    Yellowstone roads set to open

    It’s time to get your summer park plans in order. The mild winter around Montana means that the parks are beginning to awake early this year.

    Portions of roads inside Yellowstone National Park (open to bikes only for a few weeks) are set to open Friday.

    The road from West Yellowstone and Mammoth Hot Springs to Old Faithful and the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone will open for the season at 8 a.m. 

    Each spring, Yellowstone National Park plow crews clear snow and ice from 198 miles of main road, 124 miles of secondary roads and 125 acres of parking lots inside the park, as well as 31 miles of the Beartooth Highway outside the park’s Northeast Entrance to prepare for the summer season.

    Additional road segments in the park will open during May as road clearing operations progress. 

    We’ll be taking readers into both Yellowstone and Glacier in our upcoming Park-to-Park issue.

    As for Glacier – here’s a look at plowing progress on Going-to-the-Sun-Road.

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    Want more of Montana all year? Subscribe today and don’t miss our Park-to-Park issue.

    Jenna 

     

  • MT Mag_MA15_Cover low res

    Behind our cover: Meet the western tanager

    It’s a definite sign of spring when the tanagers come to Montana. They should be headed our way in the coming weeks.

    We featured a beautiful male western tanager on our March/April 2015 cover just for that reason.

    • Watch our cover come alive here

    Photographer Michael Gallacher captured this little guy during a mass migration of the birds into Montana several springs ago.

    Western Tanager mg

    Photo by Michael Gallacher

    Here’s a little bit more about our cover star bird: He was most likely following a hatch of bugs along western Montana rivers while making his way north during an annual migration. Tanagers are a medium-sized song bird that migrate north into many areas across Montana in the late spring. During their migration, tanagers frequent a wide variety of forest, woodland, scrub and partially open habitats, as well as various human-made environments such as orchards, parks and gardens, according to the Montana Field Guide. The male tanager is brightly colored, with a distinctive red head, while the female is olive green with yellow wing bars.

    Here’s the Missoulian story about the tanager influx.

    Get more of Montana (and get an up-close glimpse of our beautiful covers) by subscribing today!

    Jenna

  • Fort Peck Reservoir, present day.

    1936: Fork Peck featured in Life magazine

    Did you know that Life magazine’s first cover was a picture of Montana? 

    We went back to the archives for this one, but according to this Time.com piece from 2012, the November 1936 issue featured a cover, story and photos from Fort Peck dam taken by the wonderful Margaret Bourke-White. The story, photos and several unprinted photos were reprinted at Life.com

    She wrote about the experience in her memoir:

    I had never seen a place quite like the town of New Deal, the construction site of Fort Peck Dam. It was a pinpoint in the long, lonely stretches of northern Montana so primitive and so wild that the whole ramshackle town seemed to carry the flavor of the boisterous Gold Rush days. It was stuffed to the seams with construction men, engineers, welders, quack doctors, barmaids, fancy ladies and, as one of my photographs illustrated, the only idle bedsprings in New Deal were the broken ones.

    You can see several of Bourke-White’s cover and several photos in the Time.com blog post about the issue.

    Our May/June 2015 issue will feature at story about Fort Peck Theatre, which opened to entertain the workers building the dam. Don’t miss it! Subscribe today!

    Jenna

    • 28Aug2014 121 crop

      Pygmy owl outside Missoula. Photo by Noah Phillips

    • bald eagle

      A young bald eagle in the Flathead Valley. Photo by Whispering Peaks Photography

    • bear

      Bear takes a break near Dixon. Photo by Robin K. Ha'o

    • big buck

      A big buck sticks close to Missoula city limits. Photo @montanamagazine Instagram

    • branding

      Branding season near Canyon Creek. Photo by Mark Edward LaRowe

    • cows

      A herd of cattle near the Tobacco Root Mountains. Photo by Mark Edward LaRowe

    • geese in gibson park

      Geese in Gibson Park. Photo by Yvonne Moe Resch

    • pronghorn

      Pronghorn on the run. Photo by Whispering Peaks Photography

    • snow gees and horses

      Snow geese flyover. Photo by Whispering Peaks Photography

    • swan migration

      A snow geese closeup. Photo by Whispering Peaks Photography

    Spring slideshow: Reader wildlife shots

    If you’ve followed this blog in the past, you know that we’re pretty fond of sharing photos that our readers send us –  mostly because they send us such amazing shots.

    They came through again this spring. Along with scenic shots from all across Montana, they shared more than a few shots of animals.

    That said, here’s our spring slideshow featuring a wide range of critters frolicking under the Big Sky.

    We hope you enjoy these Montana animal shots as much as we do. Thanks so all who share their shots with us every day.

    Jenna

  • How well do you know Montana?

    montana-map-revwebWe tried something new today. It involves a test. But we think it’s a fun test because it’s all about Montana. 

    If you’ve read our past issues, it’ll be a breeze.

    Take our “How Well Do you know Montana” quiz here

    If you Google anything, that’s cheating… But if you want to learn more about Montana the fun way, subscribe today.

    Jenna

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