• Doris Sherburne, 95, and her husband, Fred, opened Mountain Pine Motel in 1947. Photo by Kurt Wilson

    Mountain Pine Motel and its lovely neighbors

    The Mountain Pine Motel is a place where you can have huckleberry pie for breakfast and see the world’s largest purple spoon.

    It’s a quintessential Montana spot, owned by the same family since it opened in 1947. Founding owner Doris Sherburne, 95, is still in charge. Writer Keila Szpaller and photographer Kurt Wilson introduced us to the motel in the our July/Aug issue.

    Terry Sherburne, owner/operator of Mountain Pine Motel near East Glacier, takes care of a potential guest. Photo by Kurt Wilson

    Terry Sherburne, owner/operator of Mountain Pine Motel near East Glacier, takes care of a potential guest. Photo by Kurt Wilson

    Along with the story of Mountain Pine, Szpaller told us about the awesome neighbors the surround the motel, including the place that encourages patrons to have pie for breakfast and the see the world’s largest purple spoon.

    The pie: AT LUNA’S RESTAURANT, ABOUT A BLOCK AWAY FROM THE HOTEL, THE MENU OFFERS HUCKLEBERRY PIE, AND IT’S LISTED AS A BREAKFAST STAPLE. IN CASE YOU WONDERED, A SLICE COSTS $5.50, AND IT’S “A PERFECTLY RESPECTABLE BREAKFAST!”

    The spoon: ALSO JUST ACROSS THE STREET? THE WORLD’S LARGEST PURPLE SPOON. YOU WON’T WANT TO MISS IT. ACTUALLY, THE ENORMOUS UTENSIL WILL LEAD YOU TO THE SPIRAL SPOON, A SMALL SHOP WITH GREAT BEAUTY IN ITS HANDCRAFTED SPOONS.

    Oh, and in case you’re still hungry, this: SURE, EAST GLACIER IS CLOSER TO CANADA THAN IT IS TO MEXICO, BUT FOR SOME DELICIOUS ENCHILADAS, BURRITOS, GUACAMOLE, AND OTHER MEXICAN FARE, HEAD TO SERRANO’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT, ACROSS THE RAILROAD TRACKS. BEVERAGE OF CHOICE? THE HOUSE MARGARITA, WITH SALT ON THE RIM.

    Here’s hoping you can go explore East Glacier soon!

    Jenna

  • #TBT: Readers share their Pictured in History photos

    It’s always fun to take a look back into Montana’s history through photos from the past.

    Throwback Thursday gives us a good excuse to highlight a section inside each issue of Montana Magazine called Pictured in History, where photos from our readers’ archives are featured.

    Below is the set we’ve run so far in 2015.

    • Do you have historical photos you can share? Email the images, with a brief description and full information about anyone pictured, to editor@montanamagazine.com 

    Jan/Feb: “A Montana Man’s Catch” 

    Maria and John Groenning, Karl and Karin Oman - 1915

    Maria and John Groenning, Karl and Karin Oman  on a summer fishing outing circa 1915. Submitted by Laurren Nirider

    March/April: “Celebration Preparation” 

    A set of friends living near Huntley Project circa 1920 prepare to cook a feast to celebrate a community occasion. It was a German custom to have local neighbors help prepare feasts for events like weddings. Submitted by Doris Redinger

    A set of friends living near Huntley Project circa 1920 prepare to cook a feast to celebrate a community occasion. It was a German custom to have local neighbors help prepare feasts for events like weddings. Submitted by Doris Redinger

    May/June 2015: “Smokejumping Roofers”

    U.S. Forest Service smokejumpers works to replace the roof on the Monture Ranger Station cabin near Ovando circa 1954. Submitted by Henry "Hank" Broderson

    U.S. Forest Service smokejumpers works to replace the roof on the Monture Ranger Station cabin near Ovando circa 1954. Submitted by Henry “Hank” Broderson

    July/August 2015: “The Good Ol Days”

    Students stand outside the Jackson school circa 1930. The school included a stables in back to house the students' horses. Submitted by Ruth Ann Nelson Little

    Students stand outside the Jackson school circa 1930. The school included a stables in back to house the students’ horses. Submitted by Ruth Ann Nelson Little

  • The Red Ants Pants Music Festival will run July 23-26 in White Sulphur Springs. Photo by Erik Petersen

    Who said it? The best-of MT quotes

    It’s not hard to wax poetic about the Big Sky State. Our contributors prove that each time they head out and talk to people across Montana for the stories that fill our magazine.

    We’ve compiled some of the best quotes – so far – from our 2015 issues. Trust me, the story attached are just as good as the quote. Read through our Who Said Its and find out, well, who said it.

    A Yurtski yurt in the Swan Mountains. Courtesy of Yurtski

    A Yurtski yurt in the Swan Mountains. Courtesy of Yurtski

    Here’s our top four quotes: 

    • “At the end of the day, I’d rather spend 14 hours struggling again Mother Nature than eight hours at a desk job.” Who said it? 
    • “From tearing it down to ripping the stinky elk hide off the bone.” Who said it?
    • “Here, Montanans will travel quite a ways. I’ve never been to a state where everyone is so proud to be from here. It’s contagious.” Who said it?
    • “It was  by far the coolest music festival I’ve been to. That one just has a really special vibe to it, and it’s the most amazing setting I’ve ever seen.” Who said it?

    Jenna

  • The towers of the Judith Gap Wind Farm, six miles south of Judith Gap, stand motionless during a windless sunrise. Photo by Kurt Wilson

    J is for: The Gap, which is a lot more than wind turbines

    J – as names-of-Montana-cities goes – is for “The Gap.” Or, should we say, Judith Gap.

    Many know the small town for its huge wind turbine farm that captures the prairie winds that blow often. But as Missoulian reporter Vince Devlin and photographer Kurt Wilson found, there’s a lot more to The Gap (as local call it) then first meets the eye.

    Including the fact that it’s school has the smallest enrollment in Montana:

    judtih gap 3

    Taekwondo instructor Gary Hart walks from his home across the street to the school’s gymnasium where he holds free classes during the summer. The school is open several evenings a week for community activities. Photo by Kurt Wilson

    When the Class of 2015 at Judith Gap High School selected its commencement speaker, the vote was unanimous.

    Which is to say, Dakota Jolliff asked an uncle to deliver her graduation address.

    She was the only senior. Some years, there haven’t been any.

    The tiniest high school in all Montana is here in Judith Gap, a town located midway between the Little Belt and Big Snowy mountain ranges. The enrollment in grades 9-12 hovers around six, and as you’ll see, they go out of their way – way out of their way – to keep it that high.

    Those two mountain ranges funnel some of the state’s harshest winter weather out of the north and down upon Judith Gap’s citizenry. Six miles south of town, huge windmill blades stretch 40 stories into the sky above the Montana prairie to catch the wind and put it to good use.

    • See a gallery of images from Judith gap here
    A visiting tourist looks over the windmill blade attraction at "Blade Park" in Judith Gap. Photo by Kurt Wilson

    A visiting tourist looks over the windmill blade attraction at “Blade Park” in Judith Gap. Photo by Kurt Wilson

    Judith Gap Wind Farm, the largest wind farm in the state, converts the air currents into electricity capable of powering all 80-some homes in Judith Gap – and approximately 359,920 more – through 90 wind towers.

    “We’re almost a mile high, and the winters are pretty rough,” Mayor Dave Foster says. “It gets to be brutal when you get a storm.”

    And did you know, that the jail is unlocked in Judith Gap? 

    The story is part of an on-going series about Montana towns by the Missoulian. Here’s a link to the rest of the stories.

    Enjoy!

    Jenna 

  • Organic grain grown in Montana featured in new Kellogg’s cereal

    Cool news for a cool Montana company: Kamut brand wheat is featured as a main star in Kellogg’s new cereal, Origins Ancient Grains Blend Cereal.

    Kamut is an organic grain grown mainly in Montana. It’s company headquarters is in Missoula.

    Here’s more about the cereal:

    origins

    Kellogg’s Origins Ancient Grains Blend cereal was developed in response to the growing consumer demand for simple foods prepared with recognizable ingredients, and is an ideal breakfast option for adults and children, as it combines nutritional value with delicious taste. The cereal is made with crunchy flakes of wheat, brown rice and barley, KAMUT® khorasan wheat puffs, spelt and quinoa. Lightly sweetened with a touch of honey, Kellogg’s Origins™ contains no artificial sweeteners, artificial flavors or hydrogenated oils.

    We featured an article about Kamut founder Bob Quinn’s commitment to organic farming and Kamut’s growing popularity in 2009. Take a look below (click the images for a larger verision): 

    kamut

     

    kamut-2

  • A rider takes on a bull at the Drummond PRCA Rodeo. Photo by Loren Benoit

    What’s it takes to ride a bull? Rodeo season ramps up across Montana

    It’s rodeo time in Montana.

    If you haven’t had a chance to get out and catch some of the action, we’ve got a few links that’ll make you feel like you didn’t miss a thing.

    The Drummond PRCA Rodeo was last weekend. And Missoula native Dustin Jenkins told the Missoulian’s Andy Bixler what it takes to successfully ride a bull. 

    “It’s 90 percent mental,” he said. “When you’re on the bull, you can’t think about anything else, you just have to react to what’s happening.”

    . . .

    The Missoula native won the bull riding competition at the 73rd annual Drummond PRCA rodeo, staying on the full eight seconds and scoring 76 points. 

    • See a photo gallery of the Drummond rodeo here

    “I was happy to get that win, because he was a really hard bull to ride,” Jenkins said. “Just being able to stay on was a victory in itself.”

    David Graham of Great Falls starts to lean off of Secret Agent during the bull riding competition at the 73rd annual Drummond rodeo on Sunday. Graham finished second. Photo by Loren Benoit

    David Graham of Great Falls starts to lean off of Secret Agent during the bull riding competition at the 73rd annual Drummond rodeo on Sunday. Graham finished second. Photo by Loren Benoit

    That held true for nearly all the bulls on Sunday. Jenkins was one of only two riders to complete a ride; the other was David Graham of Great Falls, who took second with a 64.

    And we can’t forget Buck Wild Wednesdays in Billings.

    Leighton Potter of Billings competes in the Buck Wild Wednesdays bull riding at the Rock Pile on North 27th Street on Wednesday. The weekly event will be held through September 2. Photo by Casey Page

    Leighton Potter of Billings competes in the Buck Wild Wednesdays bull riding at the Rock Pile on North 27th Street on Wednesday. The weekly event will be held through September 2. Photo by Casey Page

    Area bull riders compete in the Buck Wild Wednesdays bull riding event at the Rock Pile on North 27th Street. The weekly event will be held through September 2.

     

    If you want to catch from bull riding, head down to Darby this today for the Elite Bull Connection and Darby Bullarama. There are more than 40 bulls and lots of prize money.

     

  • A common loon takes flight over Rainy Lake in the Seeley-Swan Valley last week. There are 200 to 250 loons in Montana, including 75 nesting pairs. Photo by Michael Gallacher

    Coalition works to protect Montana loons

    Loons have become a rare sight in Montana recently. The unfortunate truth was noticed by a broad group of Montanans, which is now working to protect and preserve the birds.

    Missoulian reporter David Erickson explains:

    RAINY LAKE – Most birds’ songs are pleasing to human ears, but the haunting call of the loon – the way it pierces the air as it resonates off a quiet mountain lake’s placid surface – evokes a feeling of wildness like perhaps no other sound on Earth.

    Innumerable writers have spilled considerable ink trying to describe it, but there’s no substitute for the real thing.

    Unfortunately, people have to get pretty lucky to hear or see the creatures these days in the western U.S.

    Loons are fickle, territorial birds, and lakeshore development, motor boats, pollution, lead fishing weights and human disturbance threaten the species’ reproductive rate and habitat.

    Kristi DuBois, left, a wildlife biologist with the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, and Ashley Huinker, an Montana State University biology student, monitor loons on Rainy Lake in the Seeley-Swan Valley last week. Photo by Michael Gallacher

    Kristi DuBois, left, a wildlife biologist with the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, and Ashley Huinker, an Montana State University biology student, monitor loons on Rainy Lake in the Seeley-Swan Valley last week. Photo by Michael Gallacher

    There are only between 200 and 250 common loons in Montana, including 75 nesting pairs, making them a species of concern.

    And even though small, that’s still the largest population of loons in the lower 48 west of Minnesota. There are only one or two known nesting pairs in Idaho, for example.

    The birds don’t produce many offspring and they aren’t good at pioneering new territory.

    In the Clearwater-Blackfoot watershed of western Montana, there were only four loon chicks hatched this year, although the numbers vary every spring.

    That’s why, since 1999, a small army of state wildlife officials, agencies, tribes, businesses, volunteers and interns – collectively known as the Common Loon Working Group – has been working to observe, collect data and protect the species while educating the public about the threats to its long-term survival.

    “It’s a massive, statewide, collaborative effort,” said Kristi DuBois, a non-game wildlife biologist with Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks, as she glassed a pair of newly hatched loon chicks with a spotting scope recently at Rainy Lake in the Seeley-Swan Valley. “It takes a village to monitor loons.”

    Read the rest of the story and see more photos here

  • The Red Ants Pants Music Festival will run July 23-26 in White Sulphur Springs. Photo by Erik Petersen

    Show and tell: Our July/Aug. events calendar

    It’s prime festival time all across the U.S. In Montana, that means there are more than a few awesome weekends of fun coming up.

    We compiled a set of great Montana festival in our Show and Tell Events Calendar for July and August. We even previewed a couple in our stories (here and here).

    Photo by Tom Bauer

    Photo by Tom Bauer

    Check it out – and if you make it to one or more, send us your photos so we can put them in our Reader Submitted Photo galleries (email jpgs to editor@montanamagazine.com).

    Your Big Sky Country events calendar for July and Aug 2015

    Have something else to add? Send us an email at editor@montanamagazine.com.

    Jenna

     

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