• national park buses

    TBT: Remember these summertime stories?

    It’s that time of week again: to for a little Throwback Thursday action.

    In honor of the first day of summer on Sunday, we’re pulling up a few of our most popular stories from the summer of 2014.

    Montana State Parks guide by Kristen Inbody and Erin Madison.

    Montana State Parks guide by Kristen Inbody and Erin Madison.

    First, this awesome feature on the 75th anniversary of Montana state parks – which are really great places to play during the summer. There are 54 state parks in Montana.

    Here’s our feature from the May/June 2014 issue. It includes an interactive map so you can see where you might want to go this summer. Need a little more info? Here’s a post about a book all about the parks.

    And we can’t forget Glacier and Yellowstone when we’re talking about summer. Here’s a story on a great way to see both the parks: In vintage cruiser buses. Yellow in Yellowstone and red in Glacier.

    The feature by Ednor Therriault is posted here. And for a list of even more stories about Yellowstone, click here.

    To get our most recent dose of summertime stories, subscribe today!

    Happy summer!

    Jenna

  • Reader photo favorites: Signs of summer

    When does summer time really begin?

    Is it Memorial Day camping trip? Is it the first blooming Bitterroot? Is it the first dip in a Montana lake?

    Whatever you decide, we’ve got a set of photos to help bring on that summer mood, courtesy of our wonderful Facebook fans.

    Blooming Bitterroot. Photo by Robin K. Ha'o

    Blooming Bitterroot. Photo by Robin K. Ha’o

     

    Rufous hummingbird. Photo by Mary Kujawa

    Rufous hummingbird. Photo by Mary Kujawa

     

    Happy kit. Photo by Paul Wear

    Happy kit. Photo by Paul Wear

     

    Loon Lake. Photo by Robert Hosea, TheBobFactor.com

    Loon Lake. Photo by Robert Hosea, TheBobFactor.com

     

    Pine cone buds. Photo by Teri Garrison-Kinsman

    Pine cone buds. Photo by Teri Garrison-Kinsman

  • Ready, Set, Go! to the Thompson River Chain of Lakes

    Thompson Chain of Lakes Montana Magazine

    The water of Horseshoe Lake is clear, quiet and vibrantly colored. Photo by Cathie and Gordon Sullivan

    It’s still early spring – not quite camping weather for most of us – but those beautiful and sunny spring days make it hard not to start thinking about those summer rec plans.

    If you’re looking for ideas, we’ve got a good one in the May/June issue of Montana Magazine where Gordon and Cathie Sullivan tell us about the Thompson River Chain of Lakes in between Libby and Kalispell.

    We’re calling it the perfect tranquil retreat.

    Like a brilliant string of emeralds, the lakes thread throughout 3,000 heavily forested acres pressed between the Salish Mountains to the north and the rugged Cabinet Mountains to the south.

    Experts like Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks biologist Gael Bissell will tell you the remote Thompson River Chain of Lakes is not only a beautiful and restful recreation spot, but also represents an important stronghold for common loons, those well-dressed birds of distinction.

     Among lakes to experience nesting loons is Little McGregor, Horseshoe, Island and Lower Thompson, but approach with extreme caution and stay well outside the bright yellow buoys for best encounters. Foggy spring mornings are best. Other loon sittings can occur on almost any of the lakes in the chain.

    Here’s how to find the Thompson River Chain of Lakes

    READY, SET, GO!: TO THE THOMPSON RIVER CHAIN OF LAKES

    THIS SET OF 18 LAKES CAN BE FOUND ALONG MONTANA STATE HIGHWAY 2, SITTING BETWEEN KALISPELL AND LIBBY. THE SITE INCLUDES 83 PRIMITIVE CAMPSITES AND 8 GROUP CAMPSITES, ALL OF WHICH REQUIRE A FEE FOR OVERNIGHT CAMPING. ROADS ARE PRIMITIVE AND NOT RECOMMENDED FOR MOTOR HOMES AND LARGE TRAILERS. HOWEVER, THE 22 DEVELOPED CAMPSITES AT LOGAN STATE PARK, LOCATED ON MIDDLE THOMPSON LAKE, ARE SUITABLE FOR LARGE CAMPING UNITS